Tag: trump

Understanding the State of the Union

Tumultuous times, indeed.  America’s political parties are both under a heavy state of duress, with non-establishment candidates shaping the narrative of this election cycle.  As of this writing almost eleven million people have voted for Donald J. Trump in the Republican primary, which has resulted in him being the presumptive nominee.  Bernie Sanders, while not appearing to be in a position to win, has created far more noise than anyone had anticipated.  As of this writing around nine million people have voted for him in the Democratic primary.

While the popular vote totals are rarely referenced or brought up in America (since they technically don’t count; that’s another conversation for another time), I feel they are very important in order to provide some context to what is happening in this country right now.

Obviously, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump are extremely dissimilar candidates, philosophically.  Sanders self-identifies as a democratic socialist, while Trump is a wild card that appears to be aligning with most traditional Republican positions.  However, one common thread they share, as I’ve discussed here before, is that they’re both anti-establishment.  Their existence and success is based completely on the fact that large portions of their respective parties have had enough of the status quo, for varying reasons.

Now, it’s real easy for people on any side to belittle supporters of either candidate.  In Trump’s case, his nativist slant and acerbic, acidic discourse doesn’t bode well for someone who’s supposed to be considered the Leader of the Free World.  Regarding Sanders, it’s easy to point out that a number of his stated goals are extremely unlikely to occur in an American governmental system that is engineered to resist drastic change, by design.

For supporters of both, there’s a large backlash that is trying to tell them they’re crazy, that they’re supporting a candidate that can’t deliver what they’re promising.  They’re being told that they’re not seeing the bigger picture, that they’re not considering all the issues, that they’re not understanding why they’re wrong.

The point I think we need to understand is this: more than twenty million people have case a primary ballot for a non-establishment candidate, and we’re not finished.  That is a significant number of people; it’s more than 40% of people who cast a primary vote among both parties.

Whether anyone likes it or not, at least twenty million people are fed the fuck up with something.  Whether it’s immigrants, corporate welfare, regressive trade policies, or punitive tuition cost, people are pissed.  More people are pissed than there has been in quite a long time.

All this anger and resentment didn’t come out of nowhere.  There’s a great number of reasons for it, mainly because there are a great number of reasons for the anger and resentment.  Corporate hegemony, an inconsistent and weak economy, the continuing regression of the middle class caused by middling wages and rising costs of living, the overall corruption of our government (and how obvious it is at this point).  Lots of these causes have simmered and boiled over the last few decades, and now we’re at a point where shit happens.

This is the bed we made.  This is the country we live in.  This should not be surprising.

If your national media is allowed to focus its efforts on what’s good for money instead on what’s good for news, what you get is a national media that doesn’t inform the public sufficiently, or at worst misinforms the public with outright lies or out-of-context facts that are meaningless.  We could have cared, but we didn’t.  We ate it up and asked for more.

If we don’t speak up when the banks are allowed to buy each other and become too big to fail, then we run the risk of those banks making bad deals and needing a bailout.  We could have cared, but we didn’t.  We gave them that money and hoped they won’t do it again.

If we thought it was wrong for our government to lie to us so they could rationalize a war, we could have said something, demanded an impeachment, demanded to hold those responsible culpable.  We could have cared, but we didn’t.  We sent our sons and daughters and hoped it would be worth it.

If we thought that politicians and government officials were corrupt, we could have said something.  We could demand term limits, we could disallow corporate donations to campaigns.  We could have cared, but we didn’t.  We watched our government become bought, and hoped it would work out.

Now, we’re caring.  All this fire and anger is good for us.  There’s arguments about whether the outcome of all this is going to be positive, but I have some faith.  And I don’t have faith in much.

The good news is that throughout history, when people finally get pissed and passionate about politics, things change.  Either we get so angry that we revolt, or the systems will change to serve the new demands.  One thing is certain: something will change.  It’s usually for the better, in the end.

I feel like I need to make a note and underline it here: I am not supporting Trump as President.  My primary vote went to Bernie Sanders, and my general election vote will likely go to Hillary Clinton.  In a lot of contexts though, it won’t matter who’s President.  The principal issues with our country and our economy are beyond the President’s power anyways.  The Senate and the House, however, will react, and whoever the President is will too.  They’ll have to.

The long-standing pillars of our democracy, the Democrat and Republican parties, will change.  To resist it is to invite death; that is a universal truth that cannot be avoided.  People have spoken, they will continue to speak until they are made whole.

As crazy and weird as it looks right now, this is democracy in action.

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I can’t keep up with this primary cycle.

It’s too much.  We’ve become such a polarized, combative, ignorant, and hateful nation of dickholes.  No one thinks anymore.  Everyone jumps to the conclusion they want to jump to, and stubbornly clings to the narrative they made up in their head (or read on a Facebook meme during breakfast a week ago).  Everyone loves to make cute comparisons to horrible things for effect, then end up believing their own hyperbolic garbage.

All sides are guilty of this.  No one is exempt.  This isn’t a “Trump voter” thing, or a “stupid liberal” thing.  This is an “entire country” thing.  We are all this dumb.

We are now getting the political leaders we deserve.

One is an obstinate, hyper-religious zealot who is probably the most hated politician in the country, at least by other politicians.  He’s getting votes mainly because he’s the most aggressively Christian candidate, and being that will always gain a good chunk of votes in America.

Another is a long-term independent running in the Democratic party, and it shows.  His policies are more socialist and challenge a large concentrated power base in the country (banks, billionaires), but he’s made the mistake of using the actual words “socialist” and “revolution”.  Even though this country is 60 years removed from the last Red Scare and 15 years removed from the end of the Cold War, those two words are still frightening to many.

Yet another is one of the most establishment-approved candidates in political history, despite the fact that she would be the first woman president.  She’s tried to maintain a message that paints her presidency as something new based on the fact that she’s a woman, but in reality her politics line up perfectly with two of the last three presidents, and her overarching economic and foreign policy aligns with the interests that have shaped our country for the last 40-60 years.

Finally, there is a reality television star who can’t stop telling us how rich he is.  He has stated and supported multiple nativist and xenophobic policies, and has replied to almost any question asking about specific policy with some form of “it’s going to be great.”  We spent a week talking about his dick.  He speaks to us like we’re fifth-graders, because we are.  He’s a member of the WWE Hall of Fame.

This is it, everyone.  This is the part of the history book where there’s a new heading called “Peak and Descent.”  We have one of the most extravagant standards of living in human history, but it’s spoiled us so much that now we’re electing our political leaders by opening cereal boxes and hoping the prize is a toy.

America is fucking great.  And we’re fucking it up.